New York City in the early 1990s has been described as many things, few of them complimentary.

The administration of Mayor David Dinkins was plagued with political and police corruption scandals, and some of the highest crime rates in the history of the city. Murders and violent crimes were up, tourism was down. The Mollen Commission hearings saw confidence in the New York Police Department drop dramatically. As a result, crime soared. ...

So there I went, into the NYPD Academy a typical New Yorker. I took public policy at face value, comfortable that the government was truly interested in protecting me and my fellow citizens.

Believing that “if you have a gun, the criminal will take it and use it on you,” I was going to be a do-gooder. I was going to aggressively get those evil guns off the street. We were the cops. We were trained. We had guns, you didn’t need one. We were there to protect you.

How wrong I was.

I quickly learned in both the academy and my rookie field training that the cops probably won’t get there in time. In fact, a 911 call by definition is reactive to either a crime in progress or past crime. A victim is being, or has been created. ...

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Critiquing myself I thought, here I was, a kid in his early 20's who was allowed to carry a firearm unrestricted 24/7. Yet, doctors, bankers, lawyers, nurses, carpenters, retirees, moms, and dads couldn’t. People far more mature and responsible than I didn’t have the same ability to protect themselves that I did. But the bad guys had all the guns they wanted.

Gun laws stopped making sense. ...

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